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Brother Bru Bru Organic African Pepper Sauce

$7.95

Brother Bru-Bru’s Organic African Chili Pepper Sauce..MILD – All natural. Made with organic peppers. No Gluten. Low Sodium. There really ia a BROTHER BRU BRU, a legendary musician whom Bob Marley dubbed “Mr Tambourine Man.” “Brother Bru Bru is actually the guy about whom Bob Dylan wrote “Mr. Tambourine Man”. That’s right! Not only does he wield a mean Tamborine, but he makes a great hot sauce!When a routine check up showed that he (like 1 in 4 adults) had high blood pressure, the doc told him to cut back salt. Bruce was set on keeping joy in his life and so created this delicious, all natural, low-sodium, sugar-free hot sauce. Enjoy!

Ingredients: Apple cider vinegar, Chili peppers, garlic, domestic & African spices, & sea salt.

From: California

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Brother Bru Bru

Brother Bru-Bru’s Organic African Chili Pepper Sauce..MILD – All natural. Made with organic peppers. No Gluten. Low Sodium. There really ia a BROTHER BRU BRU, a legendary musician whom Bob Marley dubbed “Mr Tambourine Man.” “Brother Bru Bru is actually the guy about whom Bob Dylan wrote “Mr. Tambourine Man”. That’s right! Not only does he wield a mean Tamborine, but he makes a great hot sauce!When a routine check up showed that he (like 1 in 4 adults) had high blood pressure, the doc told him to cut back salt. Bruce , Brother Bru Bru, was set on keeping joy in his life and so created this delicious, all natural, low-sodium, sugar-free hot sauce. Enjoy!

Ingredients: Apple cider vinegar, Chili peppers, garlic, domestic & African spices, & sea salt.

Brother Bru Bru is From: California

Organic foods are foods that are produced using methods of organic farming — that do not involve modern synthetic inputs such as synthetic pesticides and chemical fertilizers. Organic foods are also not processed using irradiation, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives.[1] The organic farming movement arose in the 1940s in response to the industrialization of agriculture known as the Green Revolution.[2] Organic food production is a heavily regulated industry, distinct from private gardening. Currently, the European Union, the United States, Canada, Japan and many other countries require producers to obtain special certification in order to market food as organic within their borders. In the context of these regulations, organic food is food produced in a way that complies with organic standards set by national governments and international organizations.

Evidence on substantial differences between organic food and conventional food is insufficient to make claims that organic food is safer or healthier than conventional food. With respect to taste, the evidence is also insufficient to make scientific claims that organic food tastes better.  Brother Bru Bru

Meaning and origin of the term

For more details on on the production of organic food, see Organic farming.

Mixed organic bean sprouts

For the vast majority of its history, agriculture can be described as having been organic; only during the 20th century was a large supply of new chemicals introduced to the food supply.[10] The organic farming movement arose in the 1940s in response to the industrialization of agriculture known as the Green Revolution.[2]

In 1939, Lord Northbourne coined the term organic farming in his book Look to the Land (1940), out of his conception of “the farm as organism,” to describe a holistic, ecologically balanced approach to farming—in contrast to what he called chemical farming, which relied on “imported fertility” and “cannot be self-sufficient nor an organic whole.”[11] This is different from the scientific use of the term “organic,” to refer to a class of molecules that contain carbon, especially those involved in the chemistry of life. This class of molecules includes everything likely to be considered edible, and include most pesticides and toxins too, therefore the term “organic” and, especially, the term “inorganic” (sometimes wrongly used as a contrast by the popular press) are both technically inaccurate and completely inappropriate when applied to farming, the production of food, and to foodstuffs themselves.

Early consumers interested in organic food would look for non-chemically treated, non-use of unapproved pesticides, fresh or minimally processed food. They mostly had to buy directly from growers: “Know your farmer, know your food” was the motto.[citation needed] Personal definitions of what constituted “organic” were developed through firsthand experience: by talking to farmers, seeing farm conditions, and farming activities. Small farms grew vegetables (and raised livestock) using organic farming practices, with or without certification, and the individual consumer monitored.[citation needed]

Members of Toronto’s karma co-op share food and play music

Small specialty health food stores and co-operatives were instrumental to bringing organic food to a wider audience.[citation needed] As demand for organic foods continued to increase, high volume sales through mass outlets such as supermarkets rapidly replaced the direct farmer connection.[citation needed] Today there is no limit to organic farm sizes and many large corporate farms currently have an organic division. However, for supermarket consumers, food production is not easily observable, and product labeling, like “certified organic”, is relied on. Government regulations and third-party inspectors are looked to for assurance.[citation needed]

[edit] Legal definition

The National Organic Program (run by the USDA) is in charge of the legal definition of organic in the United States and does organic certification.

Main article: Organic certification

Organic food production is a heavily regulated industry, distinct from private gardening. Currently, the European Union, the United States, Canada, Japan and many other countries require producers to obtain special certification in order to market food as organic within their borders. In the context of these regulations, organic food is food produced in a way that complies with organic standards set by national governments and international organizations.

In the United States, organic production is a system that is managed in accordance with the Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA) of 1990 and regulations in Title 7, Part 205 of the Code of Federal Regulations to respond to site-specific conditions by integrating cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity.[12] If livestock are involved, the livestock must be reared with regular access to pasture and without the routine use of antibiotics or growth hormones.[13]

Processed organic food usually contains only organic ingredients. If non-organic ingredients are present, at least a certain percentage of the food’s total plant and animal ingredients must be organic (95% in the United States,[14] Canada, and Australia). Foods claiming to be organic must be free of artificial food additives, and are often processed with fewer artificial methods, materials and conditions, such as chemical ripening, food irradiation, and genetically modified ingredients. Pesticides are allowed as long as they are not synthetic.[15] However, under US federal organic standards, if pests and weeds are not controllable through management practices, nor via organic pesticides and herbicides, “a substance included on the National List of synthetic substances allowed for use in organic crop production may be applied to prevent, suppress, or control pests, weeds, or diseases.”[16] Several groups have called for organic standards to prohibit nanotechnology on the basis of the precautionary principle[17] in light of unknown risks of nanotechnology.[18]:5-6 The use of nanotechnology-based products in the production of organic food is prohibited in some jurisdictions (Canada, the UK, and Australia) and is unregulated in others.[19][20]

 

 

Additional information

Weight 1 lbs
Dimensions 1 × 1 × 5 in

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